Verizon Motorola Xoom 4G LTE upgrade will happen in September

The Motorola Xoom was the first tablet to run Android Honeycomb. And it seems like it was a rushed product. That’s especially clear if you consider the whole 4G upgrade hubbub. When it was released in February, the Xoom only had 3G connectivity, no 4G LTE support (and even units being sold today are in the same situation). Verizon then promised a hardware upgrade that would add the 4G LTE connectivity to already purchased Xoom tablets. The timeline the carrier first gave? 90 days. From February. Needless to say, those have passed and there was no sign of the update.

In fact, we haven’t heard a thing about this update for quite a while. Now that Verizon is about to launch the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1, which will come with 4G LTE from day one, the carrier seems like it wants to avoid major backlash from Xoom owners.

So, according to a leaked internal document that you can see above, the 4G LTE upgrade for the Motorola Xoom will start to become available in September. That’s right, about 7 months after the tablet hit the streets, and 4 months later than initially promised. Make of that what you will.

The upgrade procedure will involve you parting with your tablet for at least 6 working days, for you’ll have to send it to Verizon. They’ll add the missing hardware, then send it back to you.

So yeah, sometimes it clearly hurts to be an early adopter. You get to pay the most (the Xoom has for a long time been the most expensive Android Honeycomb tablet), and wait for functionality for many months.

Via Droid Life

Author: Vlad Bobleanta

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  • Bob

    Promising a service, 4G for example, to induce the purchase of a product (like a Xoom) and then not delivering, and knowing you can’t deliver when you make the promise, could be construed as fraudulent misrepresentation could it not?  Any lawyers out there willing to pick up the cudget?

  • Bob

    Promising a service, 4G for example, to induce the purchase of a product (like a Xoom) and then not delivering, and knowing you can’t deliver when you make the promise, could be construed as fraudulent misrepresentation could it not?  Any lawyers out there willing to pick up the cudget?