Elop says Nokia doesn’t want fragmentation in Windows Phone, because Android has problems with it. Quad-core phones don’t impress him

About a year ago, Nokia has bet its future on Microsoft’s Windows Phone, after understating that neither Symbian, nor MeeGo was enough to keep the company truly competitive on the smartphone market.

Right now, the Windows Phone bet isn’t a winning one. Not yet. And how could it be, since Nokia has launched only two WP handsets (Lumia 800 and Lumia 710), and announced a third one (Lumia 900) that doesn’t really bring anything new?

In any case, Nokia repeatedly said that it plans to introduce numerous Windows Phone handsets this year, some of them aimed at budget users.

Until we’ll see new Nokia WP devices, we’ve found out that Stephen Elop, the company’s CEO (as of September 2010), recently talked about the current situation at Nokia, and about competition. More exactly, in an interview with Pocket-lint, Elop declared:

“We don’t want fragmentation being introduced into Windows Phone because we are beginning to see how in a certain other eco-system that fragmentation becomes a problem.”

That “other” ecosystem is, of course, Android. Yes, Android fragmentation can be bothersome, although not really for the OS itself (or for Google), but for end users. And still, this doesn’t stop users from activating more than 700,000 Android devices each day.

I bet Nokia wouldn’t give a f*** about fragmentation if it would manage to activate even half of the number of devices that are currently activated with Android.

Elop also said that the “first priority, always, always, is to differentiate our experience from Android and iPhone. That is job one, two and three quite frankly.” Ok, good for you. But remember: different doesn’t necessarily mean better. In fact, until now, if we look at how well the Lumia 800 has performed sales-wise, it clearly doesn’t mean better. For the moment, Nokia’s Windows Phone handsets are just that: different, but without the power to attract the broad mass of consumers (who generally want either Android, or iOS on their next smartphone).

In another interview, this time with TechRadar, Stephen Elop defends the lack of multi-core processors from the first three Nokia WP handsets (they all use a 1.4GHz single-core Qualcomm CPU).

According to Elop:

“You don’t need a quad-core phone unless you want to keep your hands warm in your pocket. We’re believers in the experience so, fine you have this camera density and you have that camera density. Let’s put the pictures side-by-side and we’ll show which ones are better.”

HTC, Samsung and Apple are all working on quad-core smartphones that should be unveiled later this year. And I’m pretty sure that most users will always choose a quad-core smartphone over a single or dual core one (assuming these are all high-end devices priced similarly). That’s because, regardless of what Elop believes, selling products is not just about the experience, but also (and maybe more importantly) about the marketing hype.

Next week, Nokia will announce its Q4 and full year 2011 financial results. I’m eagerly waiting to see if it’s going to unveil the exact number of Windows Phone handsets sold. If not, this would be a confirmation of the fact that they simply didn’t sell well. But Nokia could have better luck this year, right? We’ll see.

Author: Florin

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  • Anonymous

    Mr Elop was more bothered about helping is old employes Microsoft instead of improving Nokia,he does not seem to realise what Smartphones are about an what people want,alot Nokia Symbian phone users have left Nokia because of Windows being to Restricted,Android is more like Symbian an people will prefer this,because its not so Restricted,can not see Nokia being succesful with Windows at All

  • Anonymous

    Mr Elop was more bothered about helping is old employes Microsoft instead of improving Nokia,he does not seem to realise what Smartphones are about an what people want,alot Nokia Symbian phone users have left Nokia because of Windows being to Restricted,Android is more like Symbian an people will prefer this,because its not so Restricted,can not see Nokia being succesful with Windows at All

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