Android 4.1 Jelly Bean update for the original Samsung Galaxy Note coming soon

Samsung is officially detailing the Android 4.1 Jelly Bean update for its original Galaxy Note – launched last year running Android Gingerbread, and updated in the meantime to Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich.

The update will bring not just Jelly Bean features (like Google Now), but also Samsung’s Premium Suite – which is already available to most Galaxy Note II units, and includes stuff like multi-window multitasking, Popup Note / Video / Browser, Paper Artist, and others.

Sadly, Samsung doesn’t actually say when the update will be rolled-out to Galaxy Notes around the world. But it should happen pretty soon anyway – as the benefits of the upgrade are presented over at Samsung’s official website.

Samsung Galaxy Note Jelly Bean update

Unlike the Galaxy Note II, which features a 5.5 inch display with 1280 x 720 pixels and a quad-core processor, the old Galaxy Note sports a 5.3 inch display with 1280 x 800 pixels, and has a dual-core CPU.

Next year, Samsung will reportedly introduce several new Galaxy Note devices, possibly including a 6.3 inch model, a 7.7 inch model, and a 13.3 inch one. All these should run (at least) Android 4.2 Jelly Bean at launch. Speaking of, Android 4.2 will probably make its way to the original Galaxy Note, too, but there is no way of telling when this is going ti happen. We will keep you posted anyway.

Via Engadget

Author: Florin

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  • p3ngwin

    “Sadly, Samsung doesn’t actually say when the update will be rolled-out
    to Galaxy Notes around the world. But it should happen pretty soon
    anyway”

    this is link-baiting then.

    The Samsung site for the device actually says “from Q2 2013″ : http://www.samsung.com/global/microsite/galaxynote/note/index.html?type=find

    so yes it DOES say when.

    when there is information, you don’t report it accurately, and when there isn’t information, you speculate and report it as news?

    if you don’t know when, then you don’t know “soon” either, and saying “should” is irrelevant as it “should” have been done in 2011 or any other person’s opinion of when “soon” is.

    this entire article is full of non-information like “should”, “possibly”, “reportedly”, “probably”, “no way of telling…”.

    since when did nothing but pure speculation count for news ?